Day 6 // Setting

There’s nothing more annoying than being a couple of pages into a book and still have no idea where the story is taking place. I don’t need to know the exact geographical coordinates, I don’t even need to know the city the characters live in, I just want to be able to picture them somewhere.

It’s called settting the scene.

And it’s important to do it from page one. The reader needs to feel like he’s right there in with the characters so he feels compelled to keep reading.

Setting

For today’s topic, I’ve decided to just share a video from my favorite author vlogger out there. If you don’t know Jenna Moreci, check her out. She’s awesome.

Conclusion

  • Know where your story takes place.
  • Don’t share every tiny detail.
  • Use your five senses to describe a scene.
  • Then trim the descriptions down.

Let’s Write

For the comment section below:

  1. What’s the first thing you notice when you go somewhere new? (Sights, sounds, smells?)
  2. What’s your character’s strongest sense? What should they notice first?
  3. Do you have a tendency to neglect a particular sense when you describe a scene?

For your personal wordcount:

  1. Write a scene where your MC goes somewhere new in the world you built and use your character’s five senses to describe the location. If your character has a disability, his or her other senses should be stronger. For example, in my novel Devonna, the MC has congenital insensitivity to pain, meaning that she has no sense of touch. Because of that, and the fact that it was first person POV, every description I had to write was completely different from how I would usually write them. If it was a really cold day, Devonna would notice other people shivering or their breath misting, but would never feel the cold.

Click here to keep track of your wordcount with me!

Ten days of writing

That’s it for today!

Until tomorrow!

Happy writing 🙂

writingfast

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